Is Pumpkin Good For Gout?

Is Pumpkin Good For Gout?

The quick answer?

Yes… but there are a few caveats you must consider, and we will get to that plus a lot more very soon.

But first, let’s look at what pumpkins have to offer for people who suffer from gout.

There are 28 of the 91 known essential vitamins and minerals in pumpkin. That is a fair amount when stacked up against almost any other produce. Pumpkin gives an array of power punches in vitamins such as vitamin A, beta carotene, C, E, K, plus many more.

In the mineral category pumpkin offers us calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, copper, zinc, as well as others.

High Fiber Content Helps Prevent Gout

Fiber slows down the digestion of other foods in your system, so eating high fiber foods around eating a sweet snack will help offset any purines created by the sugar in your snack food. Pumpkin seeds pack a big fiber punch at 1.7 grams of dietary fiber per ounce.

If you look at anything in nature, anytime you have fructose or sugars involved from a plant, it’s very fibrous. Fiber is natures way of curbing the insulin spikes that can ultimately lead to diabetes.

Here are some other benefits to having fiber in your diet.

Heart health: It’s been found that high fiber intake has been associated with a lower risk of heart disease, even up to 40%.

Stroke: Every time you increase your fiber intake by 7 grams daily, you’re decreasing your stroke risk by 7%.

Weight loss and management: Because fiber makes you feel full, weight loss efforts are assisted and total weight lost is reduced.

Skin health: When your body can’t excrete bad things like yeast and fungus from your body fast enough, it pushes it through your skin, which causes acne and other skin disorders. Fiber such as psyllium husk can help the body excrete unwanted materials and help prevent excretion through the skin.

Diverticulitis: You can decrease your risk of diverticulitis by around 40% by increasing dietary fiber intake, particularly insoluble fiber.

Hemorrhoids: Including more fiber in your diet is also associated with a decreased risk of hemorrhoids.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): IBS is also positively affected by an increased intake of dietary fiber.

Gallstones and kidney stones: Because of fiber’s ability to help your body regulate blood sugar, it can decrease the risk of getting gall and kidney stones. Source : (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19335713)

And It's Low In Sugar Content... But Avoid Canned Pumpkin!

Canned pumpkin is no good in this case, because it’s already got sweeteners and other things in it. Skip it and go for the fresh stuff!

You have 3 grams of sugar in a cup of natural pumpkin, where cooked or raw, but in canned pumpkin over 8 grams for a single serving, which for it is a mere half cup.

So, half the food, vitamins, and minerals but twice the sugar. It’s no good, I say!

There is ample evidence suggesting that sugar, and fructose in particular are a major part of the gout puzzle.

You can read more about the research I’ve uncovered that suggest meats have nothing to do with gout and sugar has everything to do with gout, from onset through increasing attacks, frequency and intensity.

Pumpkin Seeds Have Tryptophan, Which Helps Produce Melatonin

Tryptophan is an essential amino acid, the amino acid that was once believed to make people want to nap after Thanksgiving dinner.

Although tryptophan does aid in melatonin production, science suggests that there is not enough in turkey alone to produce that Thanksgiving day nap. But, eating pumpkin seeds regularly can help your body produce the sleep hormone more easily.

A handful is the perfect dose given to humans via a healthy and natural diet.

And this means better sleep. Since lack of sleep creates stress and stress has been linked to gout outbreaks, pumpkin seeds are a great addition to a gout diet.

One Last Tip

There is a lot of misinformation on gout, the diets that help and other misinformation, even by the main stream medical establishment.

I can assure you that meats and low purine diets are hogwash. There is enough science to cause serious doubts about meats and high purine foods.

You will want to read my post about meats, sugar and gout. It may change your entire outlook on life as someone who suffers from gout.

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